School-based interventions are increasingly being employed in Americans learning institutions to tackle the unending problem of childhood obesity. In this journal article, Mahmood et al. (2014) investigate the efficacy of utilizing school-based interventions to minimize high obesity prevalence among children. In order to achieve this objective, the researchers evaluated all published clinical trials that qualified for the study. The researchers excluded previous studies that entailed cost-effective evaluation of school-based interventions.

Running head: EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE 1

EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE 3

Childhood Obesity- PICOT Statement and Literature Search

Name

University

Date

Childhood Obesity- PICOT Statement and Literature Search

Overweight and obesity among children can be prevented, managed, and controlled using school-based interventions more effectively than non-school-based interventions within one year.

P- Population- Children with overweight and obesity Comment by Melissa Petrick: Take this and create a single PICOT statement/question.

I-Intervention- School-based interventions

C- Comparison- Non-school based interventions such as family-based interventions

O- Outcome- Desired weight reduction and BMI

T- Time- One Year

Mahmood, S., Perveen, T., Dino, A., Ibrahim, F., & Mehraj, J. (2014). Effectiveness of

school-based intervention programs in reducing prevalence of overweight. Indian

journal of community medicine: official publication of Indian Association of

Preventive & Social Medicine39(2), 87. Comment by Melissa Petrick: Did you get this online? Do you have a doi or URL?

School-based interventions are increasingly being employed in Americans learning institutions to tackle the unending problem of childhood obesity. In this journal article, Mahmood et al. (2014) investigate the efficacy of utilizing school-based interventions to minimize high obesity prevalence among children. In order to achieve this objective, the researchers evaluated all published clinical trials that qualified for the study. The researchers excluded previous studies that entailed cost-effective evaluation of school-based interventions. Five trials comprised of 3900 school-going children were incorporated into the study. The average age of the students both boys and girls, was between 8 and 13 years. The meta-analysis revealed a statistical significance beneficial impact of school-based intervention initiatives on obesity status of school children. Individual assessments suggested efficacy of these school-based efforts to tackle childhood obesity. The researchers infer that school-based interventions are effective in deterring childhood obesity and overweight problem. According to Mahmood et al. (2014), childhood overweight and obesity is a global public health concern that is responsible for high morbidity and increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and osteoarthritis. Considering the potential risks that childhood overweight and obesity pose to the American population, Mahmood et al. (2014) stress on the need to examine school-based interventions as a way to address the problem.

Amini, M., Djazayery, A., Majdzadeh, R., Taghdisi, M. H., & Jazayeri, S. (2015). Effect of

school-based interventions to control childhood obesity: a review of

reviews. International journal of preventive medicine6.

In this article, Amini et al. (2015) hold that eh efficacy of school-based interventions to prevent and manage overweight and obesity among school-going children has been a subject of debate among healthcare professionals. In view of that, Amini et al. (2015) conduct a critical review, meta-analysis, and examination of policy briefs and reports that target children and adolescents. This review included interventional studies that have a control group and sought to deter or reduce overweight and obesity in a school setting. Four key systematic reviews, alognside four meta-analyses were found to meet the eligibility criteria. As a result, they were incorporated into the review. The findings of the review suggested that the implementation of multi-component interventions does not necessarily improve the anthropometric outcomes. While intervention durations are critical determinant of the efficacy, researches aimed at evaluating the length of time needed were lacking. Furthermore, the researchers assert the need for interventional efforts for children in order to report any unwarranted mental or physical adverse impacts that stem from the intervention. The researchers also revealed that BMI is one of the most popular indicators utilized for assessing the childhood obesity prevention or treatment trials. Finally, Amini et al. (2015) recommend that future studies on school-based interventions should be done to prevent or control overweight or obesity.

Ickes, M. J., McMullen, J., Haider, T., & Sharma, M. (2014). Global school-based

childhood obesity interventions: a review. International journal of environmental

research and public health11(9), 8940-8961.

Childhood obesity is a problem that has sparked a major global health crisis. According to Ickes et al. (2014), many school-based interventions have been developed and implemented to curb this growing crisis. In response to this phenomenon, Icke et al. (2014) undertake a comprehensive review that is aimed at comparing and contrasting the American and global school-based overweight and obesity prevention and management efforts. To complete this task, the researchers use five major databases. The selection methodology for these databases include primary research, overweight or obesity prevention interventions, school, based, and studies that were published between 2002 to 2013. In totality, approximately 20 interventions met the eligibility standards of inclusion. The research showed that the interventions that were implemented in the United States and globally led to the successful outcomes. These included positive changes in student’s BMI. However, the researchers observe that different approaches were utilized to attain success. This reinforces the fact that a one-size-fits-all approach is not necessary for impacting childhood obesity. Nonetheless, establishing on successful interventions in future school-based obesity management efforts should have the capacity to integrate culturally-specific interventional strategies. They should also seek to include an environmentally-friendly component that includes parents whenever possible.

Maatoug, J., Msakni, Z., Zammit, N., Bhiri, S., Harrabi, I., Boughammoura, L., &

Ghannem, H. (2015). Peer Reviewed: School-Based Intervention as a Component of

a Comprehensive Community Program for Overweight and Obesity Prevention,

Sousse, Tunisia, 2009–2014. Preventing chronic disease12.

In this article, Maatoug et al. (2015) argue that the task of combating childhood obesity at a tender age, through improvements of physical activities, nutritional interventions, and other behaviors, is instrumental to the prevention of more crucial health concerns in adulthood. Consequently, the researchers evaluate the efficacy of a school-based aspect of a community behavioral intervention on overweight and obesity rates among adolescents in Tunisia. Using a quasi-experimental school-based intervention method, Maatoug et al. (2015) include an intervention group and a control group located in Sousse Msaken. The intervention took three years, with information that pre-intervention gathered from 2009 to 2010 school year period. The researchers then undertook a descriptive evaluation and multivariate assessment to determine the impact of the intervention on risks of excess weight. The study findings suggested the existence of a major increase in fruits and vegetable intake by the intervention group. The intervention group also improved in terms of acquiring the normal weight category. There was also a decrease in students’ overweight population. This study suggests that the school-based interventions are protective measures to curb excessive weight gain for participating school-going children. Furthermore, the research indicates that school-based interventions are effective in increasing the pattern of healthy dietary habits and minimizing risks of excessive weight gains. It also sheds light on the significance of multidisciplinary approach to offer an environment that is conducive to healthy behaviors for children and adolescents.

Kothandan, S. K. (2014). School based interventions versus family-based interventions in

the treatment of childhood obesity-a systematic review. Archives of Public

Health72(1), 3.

There has been a widespread debate among health professionals over whether school-based interventions work better than family-based approaches. In an effort to settle this impasse, Kothandan (2014) conducted a comprehensive review aimed at drawing comparison between school-based interventions and family-based interventions in the treatment, management, and control of childhood overweight and obesity. According to Kothandan (2014), the prevalence rates of childhood obesity, which has steadily increased in the last ten years, is currently regarded as a major public health concern. Current treatment options are often premised on two major models: school-and family-based strategies. Nonetheless, most studies have not yet drawn a major comparison between the two treatment options. Therefore, Kothandan (2014) conducted a database search of resources such as Medline, Pub med, and Science Direct with the view of executing the search for primary research papers in accordance with various inclusion criteria. The review also included randomized control trial and quasi-randomized controlled trials on the basis of family- and school-based interventions. The study identified 1231 studies, 13 of which met the researcher’s criteria. The research revealed that family-based interventions were ideal for children aged below 12, whereas school-based interventions worked for children aged between 12 and seventeen years for both long-term and short-term outcomes.

Gonzalez-Suarez, C., Worley, A., Grimmer-Somers, K., & Dones, V. (2009). School-based

interventions on childhood obesity: a meta-analysis. American journal of preventive

medicine37(5), 418-427.

Finally, Gonzalez-Suarez et al. (2009) argue that childhood obesity is a major predictor of chronic lifestyle diseases in adulthood. Therefore, the researchers explore the effectiveness of school-based programs in the prevention and management of childhood obesity. After conducting a comprehensive literature search, coupled with a meta-analysis for RCTs and clinical controlled trials on school-based interventions, the results indicated that the odds of participants’ being overweight and obese in the school-based programs compared with the control arm were significantly protective in the short-term. However, school-based interventions were effective in the long-run. Therefore, longer running initiatives were more effective than shorter programs.

References

Amini, M., Djazayery, A., Majdzadeh, R., Taghdisi, M. H., & Jazayeri, S. (2015). Effect of

school-based interventions to control childhood obesity: a review of

reviews. International journal of preventive medicine6.

Gonzalez-Suarez, C., Worley, A., Grimmer-Somers, K., & Dones, V. (2009). School-based

interventions on childhood obesity: a meta-analysis. American journal of preventive

medicine37(5), 418-427.

Ickes, M. J., McMullen, J., Haider, T., & Sharma, M. (2014). Global school-based

childhood obesity interventions: a review. International journal of environmental

research and public health11(9), 8940-8961.

Kothandan, S. K. (2014). School based interventions versus family based interventions in

the treatment of childhood obesity-a systematic review. Archives of Public

Health72(1), 3.

Maatoug, J., Msakni, Z., Zammit, N., Bhiri, S., Harrabi, I., Boughammoura, L., &

Ghannem, H. (2015). Peer Reviewed: School-Based Intervention as a Component of

a Comprehensive Community Program for Overweight and Obesity Prevention,

Sousse, Tunisia, 2009–2014. Preventing chronic disease12.

Mahmood, S., Perveen, T., Dino, A., Ibrahim, F., & Mehraj, J. (2014). Effectiveness of

school-based intervention programs in reducing prevalence of overweight. Indian

journal of community medicine: official publication of Indian Association of

Preventive & Social Medicine39(2), 87.

 

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