Discussion Response

NEED A substantial discussion response to this please

WK 3 DQ 2 Initial Post

Motivations among employees of public and private organizations are different by means of the employees personal feeling about the organization, from my perspective. Employees of a public organization have more compassion and feel as if his or her service is that of a civic duty (Perry, et. al.. 2010). Public organizations are not providing their services to solely generate finances. Employees of a public organization is aware that he or she are working for a non-profit organization and are performing his or her job because of the passion that he or she has for the position or organization. Private organizations are for profit organizations; therefore, they are working to maintain finances and resources to keep the organization striving. The employees are aware that if finances are not generated then their employment may be on the line. Personally, I believe that is why employees of a public organization are more compassionate than those employees of a private organization.

As an employee of a public and nonprofit organization responsibility and growth and advancement are intrinsic factors that leads to my motivation. In a public and nonprofit organization, I believe it is my responsibility to serve and provide the necessary resources to the clients. My passion is to help and assist individuals in a positive way. Knowing that I am handling my responsibilities in a meaningful way is motivation within itself for me. Also, growth and advancement are intrinsic motivations for me as well. With helping and assisting the clients of a public and nonprofit organization, I am also learning and growing as well. Maintaining up to date trainings, resources, and research can promote advancement in the organization along with reaching personal goals.

As a manager of a nonprofit organization with limited financial resources, I would provide performance rewards, and initiate employee engagement to in order to maintain or increase employee motivation. As a manager in an organization, acknowledging the hard work and dedication of employees may give them the boost of motivation that they need to be motivated. Praising an employee for their performances and achieving their goals makes them feel good about themselves and that is motivation to keep going within itself. Employee engagement would be conducted through meetings and surveys (Trinka, n.d.). These meetings and surveys would allow the employees to voice his or her opinions related to their attitudes, opinions, productivity, and job satisfaction (Trinka, n.d.). Not only will their voice be heard but implementing those aspects could improve the workplace environment for the employees.

Resources

Perry, J. L., Hondeghem, A., & Wise, L. R. (2010). Revisiting the motivational bases of public

service: Twenty years of research and an agenda for the future. Public Administration Review, 70(5), 681–690. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Trinka, J. (n.d.). What’s a manager to do? From GovLeaders.org. Retrieved

from http://govleaders.org/whats_a_manager_to_do.htm

Readings

  • Cohen, S., Eimicke, W., & Heikkila, T. (2013). The effective public manager: Achieving success in government organizations (5th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
    • Chapter 3, “How to Find and Keep Good People (pp. 47–74)
    • Chapter 4, “Developing Effective Working Relationships” (pp. 75–90)
  • Northouse, P. G. (2019). Leadership: Theory and practice (8th ed.). Thousand Oaks: CA: Sage Publications.
    • Chapter 6, “Path-Goal Theory” (pp. 117-138)
  • Laureate Education. (2014a). Decision making in the federal government: The Wallace S. Sayre Model. Baltimore, MD: Author.
  • Maslow, A. H. (1943). A theory of human motivation. Psychological Review, 50(4), 370–396.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
  • Perry, J. L., Hondeghem, A., & Wise, L. R. (2010). Revisiting the motivational bases of public service: Twenty years of research and an agenda for the future. Public Administration Review, 70(5), 681–690.
    Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
  • Trinka, J. (n.d.). What’s a manager to do? From GovLeaders.org. Retrieved from http://govleaders.org/whats_a_manager_to_do.htm
 

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