critique discussion below

Gary,

There are multiple ways for the local government officials to convince residents that this “invasion of privacy” (collection of personal information during account registration) is necessary. In my expert opinion on this situation, I would suggest addressing that many internet services, many which have felt the pinch of being hacked, have embraced two-factor authentication for their users (Griffith, 2018). It will display to the residents that the newly adopted “cybersecurity” policy is nothing new. If there are websites and applications like Facebook login approvals, Instagram 2 factor authentication, and Apple two factor authentication which uses this type of security, it is to protect the user and the network.

If there are a few or many more who opposes the new policy, well, the local government officials should elaborate that if there was an attack or breach against their online services. It will also affect the residents who are members with their sites too. Our primary objective is to implement stronger security and software for our websites and even, implement stronger security for our users. The phrase which I believe that can convince the residents to accept the new policy is, “A Chain Is As Strong As The Weakest Link.” To ensure we can prevent any vulnerabilities, in or out, we must implement stronger security even with our users.

Once the residents settle in with the new policy, we can address the two-factor authentication benefits with the local government and the residents. The first benefit is, “Reducing the probability of an Internet attacker gaining access to an account, resulting in fewer security breaches” (Soprano, 2014). As I discussed earlier, by implementing stronger security upon the local government’s online services websites and the users’ passwords, there will be shortages of attacks. The second benefit is, “Lower total costs of disruption” (Soprano, 2014). We’ll be able to lower helpdesk, security management, and operating costs since it can, “Help remedy these time-consuming and costly password-reset calls by providing a safe and secure way for end users to reset their passwords” (French, 2014). The last benefit is, “An additional protection option that can be advertised to account holders; having this option available reduces the reputation risk following a security breach” (Soprano, 2014). Instead of confronting the two-factor authentication as an “invasion of privacy,” but additional security that can increase productivity and flexibility (French, 2014).

When implementing the new policy, the local government should not suspend it for 90 days to allow members of the public to comment. But, to implement the new policy first and then announcing the public to share an opinion or ideas about it. I disagree with the suspension due to cybersecurity exploitation. It can cause many issues by allowing 90 days for attackers and dishonest members plotting against it. Once the policy is active in the system, the policy could receive additional protection and feedback instead of having it unprotected. In my opinion, I would not recommend the suspension because once receiving criticism or feedbacks. It could delay the policy being released. As it’s delayed, the local government’s online services website is open for security breach and attacks where it could have been preventable.

 

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